Paltry Peas

6_16_14punypeasOh, how we love English shell peas. This year was going to be the year that that an honest-to-goodness yield would be enjoyed. Approximately 15 of the 20 peas ‘n a pot plants germinated, but the plants were so teeny tiny (they rose to the dizzying height of 3-4″ — which is puny, even for a dwarf) that each produced one one or two pods, with 2-5 peas each. Which means we harvested about a 1/4 cup of peas.

Boo. Here’s the thing: if you can believe it, they may have been, GASP, over-watered. Excessive hydration is rarely a probably for POD, but the Hurricane helper happens to love hoses and water. So you know, things happen. For future reference, though, here’s a handy how-to from the University of Minnesota.

6_16_14peaharvestThese little guys were planted in mid-April and harvested this week. Which, thankfully, lined up perfectly with the bag o’ peas from Greensgrow’s CSA. Which mean’s the Endurer enjoyed a lovely Father’s Day dinner of seared scallops with uber locally-grown herbs, peas with fresh-picked mint, and lemon strawberry bars for dessert.

Pretty Peas

peasThose Tom Thumb peas planted back in March are looking pretty good. Not that that means we’ll get more than one pea pod per plant. Which would be almost enough for the Hurricane’s lunch. But hey, stuff’s growing.

Peas Podded

Sorry, so bad in so many directions. Couldn’t resist.

Peas in a pot, on POD
Peas in a pot, on POD

Planting Peas

Peas are a new experiment for Plants on Deck and, according to the Philadelphia County Cooperative Extension, the time is ripe for planting. Prussian Blue Peas, courtesy of Bartram’s Garden will, one hopes, wind their way up POF’s handrail and the Maestros will grace the little blue deck. Peas don’t transplant particularly well, so they’ve been direct-seeded in rich soil with a pinch of rhizobium, a little organic fertilizer and a few tablespoons of coffee grounds to boost the soil’s nitrogen levels.

Here’s hoping we can harvest these lovelies before the precious real estate is required for heat-loving melons, tomatoes, and cucumbers!