POD Had a Plan

Sure, it might be the tiniest bit early to be thinking about seeds, but snow’s on the ground and temps are plummeting.  And Plants on Deck has been dormant for far too long.

radish blossom
first they bloomed

These radishes began their journey nine months ago. They bloomed. They developed pods. They dried. They were husked. Over 300 seeds were rescued from the dried stalks of just two  radishes (a roseheart and a long scarlet). At last year’s prices those 300 seeds would have cost $37.50.

radish pods
POD pods

dried radish pods
dried radish pods
300 radish seeds
and that's 300+ seeds

(And a special thanks to bethysmalls for an adorable seed envelope.)

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More Than a Handful is a Waste

Gardening plans for next year always begin to form as the fruits from this year’s labors are being harvested. Recently, much time was spent researching potential muskmelon varieties for next year. Then I realized, the solution is right there at the farmers’ market, gazing up at a me. Duh.

Over the past few weeks the husband and I have been sampling melon varieties. It’s a rough job, surely, but someone’s gotta’ do it. Given the space limitation of a roof deck garden, cantaloupe options are limited. The great thing about this method is it allows POD to choose the melon that tastes best and happens to be tiny.

charentais melonStep One: Slice the melon in half and scoop out the seeds. This is a wonderful French heirloom called Charentais. It grows to 2-3 pounds, probably a little on the large side, but worth a shot.

Step Two: Place the seeds in a wire strainer and rinse the seeds while smooshing the goo out the strainer. cleaning seeds

Step Three: Put the seeds in a bowl. Cover with warm water. Scoop off the seeds that float; they’re no good to you. straining melon seeds

Step Four: Rinse some more.

Step Five: place them in the wire strainer and allow them to air dry them thoroughly! About three days. melon seeds drying

Step Six: Seal them in a well-labeled bag and freeze.